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The most recent (5th version) of the Consensus Statements and Tools for concussion Assessment are now available. A must read and must download resource!

Downloads:

The Concussion Recognition Tool 5 (CRT5)
 The Concussion Recognition Tool 5 (CRT5) is the most recent revision of the Pocket Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 2 that was initially introduced by the Concussion in Sport Group in 2005. The CRT5 is designed to assist non-medically trained individuals to recognise the signs and symptoms of possible sport-related concussion and provides guidance for removing an athlete from play/sport and to seek medical attention. This paper presents the development of the CRT5 and highlights the differences between the CRT5 and prior versions of the instrument.

 Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 5th Edition (SCAT5)

Most recent revision of a sport concussion evaluation tool for use by healthcare professionals in the acute evaluation of suspected concussion. The revision of the SCAT3 (first published in 2013) culminated in the SCAT5. The revision was based on a systematic review and synthesis of current research, public input and expert panel review as part of the 5th International Consensus Conference on Concussion in Sport held in Berlin in 2016. The SCAT5 is intended for use in those who are 13 years of age or older. The Child SCAT5 is a tool for those aged 5–12 years, which is discussed elsewhere.

Child SCAT5:SPORT CONCUSSION ASSESSMENT TOOL FOR CHILDREN AGES 5 TO 12 YEARS

The SCAT 3rd edition (Child SCAT3) was developed for children aged between 5 and12 years. Research to date was reviewed and synthesised for the 5th International Consensus Conference on Concussion in Sport in Berlin, Germany, leading to the current revision of the test, the Child SCAT5

2017 Concussion in Sport Consensus Statement

“The 2017 Concussion in Sport Group (CISG) consensus statement is designed to build on the principles outlined in the previous statements1–4 and to develop further conceptual understanding of sport-related concussion (SRC) using an expert consensus-based approach. This document is devel- oped for physicians and healthcare providers who are involved in athlete care, whether at a recre- ational, elite or professional level. While agreement exists on the principal messages conveyed by this document, the authors acknowledge that the science of SRC is evolving and therefore individual management and return-to-play decisions remain in the realm of clinical judgement.

This consensus document reflects the current state of knowledge and will need to be modified as new knowledge develops. It provides an overview of issues that may be of importance to healthcare providers involved in the management of SRC. This paper should be read in conjunction with the systematic reviews and methodology paper that accompany it. First and foremost, this document is intended to guide clinical practice; however, the authors feel that it can also help form the agenda for future research relevant to SRC by identifying knowledge gaps.”

READ FULL STATEMENT 

Readers are encouraged to copy and freely distribute this Berlin Consensus Statement on Concussion in Sport, the Concussion Recognition Tool version 5 (CRT5), the Sports Concussion Assessment Tool version 5 (SCAT5) and/or the Child SCAT5. None of these are subject to copyright restriction, provided they are used in their complete format, are not altered in any way, not sold for commercial gain or rebranded, not converted into a digital format without permission, and are cited correctly.

Medical legal considerations

The consensus statement is not intended as a clinical practice guideline or legal standard of care, and should not be interpreted as such. This document is only a guide, and is of a general nature, consistent with the reasonable practice of a healthcare professional. Individual treatment will depend on the facts and circumstances specific to each individual case. It is intended that this document will be formally reviewed and updated before 31 December 2020.